Mindfulness is Religion in Schools

By Tina OlesenReligious_syms

There is a double standard when it comes to religion in public education. Christianity? No way. Secularists argued that they did not want anyone’s religion imposed upon their children, while ironically fighting to impose secular humanism on all public school children. So why aren’t they up in arms about mindfulness?

The myth about mindfulness is that it is a non-religious practice. This is simply false advertising. The religiosity of mindfulness is self-evident. It is a meditation practice that comes directly out of eastern religions such as Hinduism and Buddhism. In much the same way as the Lord’s Prayer is tied to Christianity (and was banned from public schools on that basis), mindfulness meditation is unquestionably religious.

John Lennon crooned that we should all imagine what the world would be like if there were “no religion” and many people believe that some sort of place of neutrality really exists when it comes to religion. In the narrowest sense of the definition of the word religion, people might be able to escape labelling themselves as belonging to one of the world’s recognised religions such as Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam or Christianity. However, if we look at religion in the broadest sense, one’s religion is simply the outward manifestation of one’s beliefs about the origin, nature, purpose and meaning of life. One of Webster’s definitions for religion is simply “a cause, principle, or system of beliefs held to with ardor and faith.”

Since public schools teach about the origin, nature, purpose and meaning of life, they teach a religion. It is no good to say that they teach no one religion exclusively, because even teaching that all religions are equal is in itself “a cause, principle, or system of beliefs held to with ardor and faith.”

So far, it seems as if the religion that is being taught in schools is whatever one looks to be the most non-offensive to secular humanists. If a religion like Buddhism can somehow be dressed down to look as secular humanistic as possible, then it gets a pass in our public schools. Public funding from taxpayers’ pockets goes to support the indoctrination of all children into a Buddhist or Hindu worldview: how is that acceptable in a public school system that was built on Christian foundations, but now claims to be secular?

A recent article in Maclean’s magazine stated that mindfulness is “a non-religious meditation practice with roots in Buddhism…” This is the kind of doublespeak that the proponents of mindfulness use to try to market their meditation technique as secular. The article goes on to describe how the marketers try to stay away from religious sounding terms and religious paraphernalia like Buddhist chimes in some markets, because some parents may find them objectionable. However, no matter how much they try to strip away any religious connotations, it is obvious that mindfulness meditation fits the definition of a religious practice, in both the narrowest and broadest senses of the term.

“No religion” in our schools is something imagined but never practiced, because education is religious. When public schools left their Christian foundations for a supposedly secular curriculum, the moral foundation began to crumble beneath the school houses. With Christianity banned from our schools, teachers continued to try to provide moral training, but they no longer had the moral absolutes of Christianity to stand on. When students are given license to determine right and wrong for themselves, chaos and confusion results. This lack of moral training resulting in undisciplined students is now being addressed in schools with mindfulness meditation (turning to a different religion) in an attempt to bring order. It won’t work, and here’s why.

We need only to look at what history teaches us to see the results of religious training in a culture. Carefully examine the cultures that result from the various world religions, and compare them with Christianity. The Christian moral consensus that our society was built upon provided a stable foundation. The law of God (which stands over and above humankind) was the measuring stick or moral absolute that judged society and gave us our concept of right and wrong, providing a foundation for law and education. Truly following the teachings of Jesus Christ results in the cherishing of children, the education of both boys and girls, the care of the sick and the poor, and unselfishly seeking the good of one’s neighbour – all of which work towards the flourishing of a culture. Can this honestly be said of any other religion, philosophy, or teaching?

As Francis Schaeffer, a Christian apologist, correctly pointed out, secular humanism does not provide a strong enough base for human society. If as a society we no longer submit to the truth that the God of the Bible is the authority on what is right and wrong, how then will our laws be decided? By taking a vote? If so, then the majority (51% of the people) seize the power to decide and judge what is right or wrong for everyone else, and get to impose their “law” on the rest of society. If God’s authority is ignored, who then judges the “laws” of the 51%? As Schaeffer rightly stated, “If there is no absolute by which to judge society, society is absolute.”

A 51% majority which has absolute power to impose their own preferences which they call “laws” on society is nothing but a tyranny. Consider how students today in our public schools are being primed to be ruled by this 51%. Mindfulness meditation teaches students not to judge between right and wrong. It encourages children to develop “non-judgmental awareness” of their thoughts and feelings. This erodes their ability to distinguish good from evil, and does not train them to make moral choices based upon biblical moral teachings. In order to mature and develop moral character, children have to be equipped to make moral choices.

Our children need sound biblical moral training so that they will be able to distinguish good from evil, and so that they will not be tossed about by every wind of popular culture. As a society, it is time that we recognised we cannot bulldoze our Christian foundations and expect the house to remain standing. Jesus Christ and His teaching provide the only foundation that will allow for our children and our culture to flourish.

Jesus is not merely a moral teacher who requires His followers to obey His teaching in their own strength. With the sacrifice of His life, He provided the only answer to our moral failure. He did what only God in human flesh could do. Jesus led a perfect life, died to pay the penalty for our sins, rose again from the dead and now gives His followers His Holy Spirit to live in them as the power to keep His moral law. This cannot be said of any leader of any other religion. Our hope for our children and ourselves is in Jesus Christ alone.

“Great and amazing are your deeds, O Lord God the Almighty!
Just and true are your ways, O King of the nations!
Who will not fear, O Lord, and glorify your name?
For you alone are holy.
All nations will come and worship you,
for your righteous acts have been revealed.”

7 thoughts on “Mindfulness is Religion in Schools

  1. Pingback: West Meets East | Paula Carnes

  2. This is a great blog I am learning so much about the education system in Canada. Is mindfulness practiced in all schools in Canada?

    • Hi, Emily, I am glad this blog is helpful to you! Good question about mindfulness. It is difficult to know exactly how widespread mindfulness is in Canadian schools. It may not be called “mindfulness” even when it is the same practice. Sometimes it is called taking a “brain break” or “social emotional learning” or it may be called a “self-regulation” technique. According to the Hawn Foundation’s website, about 140 schools in the Vancouver, BC region are using the MindUP program. I don’t have data on other regions.

Leave a Comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s